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 Premier Dental Group 

 South Florida's Complete Dental Team 

 1701 E Hallandale Beach Blvd 

 Hallandale Beach, FL 33009 

 www.ThePremierSmile.com 

 (954) 779-3000 

 PREMIER DENTAL BLOG 


End of fillings in sight as scientists find Alzheimer's drug makes teeth grow back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 19th, 2016

 


 Gum disease bacteria may cause heart disease

A University of Florida study shows that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease -- a discovery that could change the way heart disease is diagnosed and treated. Researchers report their findings today at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology."We report evidence that introduction of oral bacteria into the bloodstream in mice increased risk factors for atherosclerotic heart disease. Our hope is that the American Heart Association will acknowledge causal links between oral disease and increased heart disease. That will change how physicians diagnose and treat heart disease patients," says Irina M. Velsko, a graduate student in the University of Florida's College of Medicine, who presented the data.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the North America. Gum disease affects 46 percent of the U.S. population and is caused by bacteria that grow on the teeth under the gums. Although doctors know that patients with gum disease are at higher risk for heart disease, gum disease isn't viewed as a traditional risk factor for heart disease. In 2012, the American Heart Association published a statement that they support the association between gum disease and heart disease, but not causal association.

"In Western medicine there is a disconnect between oral health and general health in the rest of the body; Dentistry is a separate field of study from Medicine. The mouth is the gateway to the body and our data provides one more piece of a growing body of research that points to direct connections between oral health and systemic health," says Kesavalu.

"Our intent is to increase physician awareness of links between oral bacterial infection and heart disease. Understanding the importance of treating gum disease in patients with heart disease will lead to future studies and recommendations for careful attention to oral health in order to protect patients against heart disease," says cardiologist Alexandra Lucas of the University of Florida, College of Medicine, who is a co-investigator in the research. 

 

October 12th, 2014

  


 Cure for Type 1 diabetes imminent after Harvard stem-cell breakthrough

Harvard University has produced the vast quantities of insulin-producing cells needed for transplants.


It could mean the end of daily insulin injections for the 400,000 people in Britain living with Type 1 diabetes.

And it marks the culmination of 23-years of research for Harvard professor Doug Melton who has been trying to find a cure for the disease since his son Sam was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as a baby.

“We are now just one pre-clinical step away from the finish line,” said Prof Melton.

Asked about his children’s reaction he said: "I think like all kids, they always assumed that if I said I'd do this, I'd do it,

"It was gratifying to know that we can do something that we always thought was possible.”

A cure for diabetes could be imminent after scientists discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells, in a breakthrough hailed as significant as antibiotics.

Harvard University has, for the first time, managed to manufacture the millions of beta cells required for transplantation.

The stem cell-derived beta cells are presently undergoing trials in animal models, including non-human primates, where they are still producing insulin after several months, Prof Melton said.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin - the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels.

If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high it can seriously damage the body's organs over time.

While diabetics can keep their glucose levels under general control by injecting insulin, that does not provide the fine tuning necessary to properly control metabolism, which can lead to devastating complications such as blindness or loss of limbs.

Around 10 per cent of all diabetes is Type 1, but it is the most common type of childhood diabetes. 29,000 youngsters suffer in Britain.

The team at Harvard used embryonic stem cells to produce human insulin-producing cells equivalent in almost every way to normally functioning cells in vast quantities.

Chris Mason, Professor of Regenerative Medicine, University College London, said it was ‘potentially a major medical breakthrough.’

“If this scalable technology is proven to work in both the clinic and in the manufacturing facility, the impact on the treatment of diabetes will be a medical game-changer on a par with antibiotics and bacterial infections,” he said.

Professor Anthony Hollander, Head of Institute of Integrative Biology at the University of Liverpool, added:“This is very exciting fundamental research that solves a major roadblock in the development of a stem cell treatment for diabetes.

“The study provides a very elegant and convincing method for generating functional insulin-producing cells in large numbers.”

Professor Mark Dunne, at Manchester University, added: Overall this is an important advance for the field of diabetes and people with Type 1 diabetes.”

Professor Elaine Fuchs, of Rockefeller University, described the findings as "one of the most important advances to date in the stem cell field".

"For decades, researchers have tried to generate human pancreatic beta cells that could be cultured and passaged long term under conditions where they produce insulin.”

A report on the work is published in the journal Cell. 

September 28th, 2014

 

 12 Teeth Friendly Foods

Ever wonder if the foods you’re eating are good for your teeth? Odds are you’re more worried about avoiding the foods that may damage or rot your teeth. Here are a few surprising foods that can actually help improve your smile. 

• Milk and Yogurt: High calcium content strengthens teeth and makes the enamel healthier and whiter. 

• Pears: Aside from their sweet taste, pears have the capability of neutralizing odor-causing and staining bacteria as well as help wash away food debris with its juicy interior. 

• Water: Not only is water the best drink out there for you, it also washes away pigmented food and reduces the acidity in your mouth. It is recommended to drink a sip of water after each time you consume dark colored food and drinks. 

• Oranges: Citrus can be very detrimental to your teeth enamel as it strips away the protective coating on your teeth, but in small doses can actually help whiten your teeth by eroding and killing bacteria, plaque and food debris.

• Cheese: While all cheeses contain healthy amounts of calcium, the whiter the cheese, the better it is for your teeth. Goat cheese for instance is a stainless cheese that contains plenty of calcium to strengthen your teeth plus help to prevent any staining. 

• Broccoli: Raw broccoli can help keep your teeth looking bright, as the florets of the broccoli will scrub the surface of your teeth without sticking, acting like a natural brush.

• Celery and Carrots: Vegetables with high water content, such as celery and carrots are great for minimizing food debris and stains on your teeth. Not only do they promote saliva production, but they also help strengthen gums.

• Baking Soda: Most toothpastes share the common ingredient, baking soda, which is actually a form of salt. Using baking soda on its own also acts as a mild abrasive that works at scrubbing away plaque and surface stains. 

• Apples: An apple a day keeps the doctor away, and in this case, the dentist, too. The crispness of apples strengthens gums while the high water content helps wash away plaque, bacteria, and can neutralize acidity. 

• Onions: Who would have thought the common bad breath vegetable would also aid in better oral health? Their colorless interior helps prevent any staining while the aftertaste will be sure to make you want to brush right away.

• Seeds and Nuts: Aside from their high protein, vitamins and fat content the abrasiveness of seeds and nuts cleans the surface of teeth by scrubbing plaque and stains. 

• Strawberries: Though they may be red, strawberries actually contain malic acid, a natural astringent that helps remove surface stains and discoloration. 

 


 September 15th, 2014

first aid tooth box 

Health Tip: If Your Child Has a Dental Emergency

Few things are more frightening for young children and their parents than a true dental emergency.
The American Dental Association suggests how to handle common examples:

- If your child’s tooth is knocked out, place it back in the mouth without touching the root. Otherwise, keep it moist by placing it between your child’s cheek and gum or in some milk. Call the dentist without delay.
- If your child’s tooth is cracked, rinse the mouth using warm water, and apply a cold compress to the face to minimize swelling.
- For a bitten lip or tongue, carefully clean the wound.
- If your child complains of a toothache, rinse the mouth with warm water and carefully floss to remove any lodged food. Never give a child aspirin.
- If your child has an object lodged in the mouth, gently floss to remove it. However, do not use any sharp instrument.

 

 

September 6th, 2014

Dental Health and Overall Health

Healthy mouth, healthy body: The link between them may surprise you.
The condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall health. Find out how oral health is linked to diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and more.

Taking care of your teeth isn't just about having a nice smile and pleasant breath. Recent research has found a number of links between oral health and overall health. While in many cases, the nature of this link still isn't clear — researchers have yet to conclude whether the connections are causal or correlative — what is certain is that the condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall physical health.

Oral Health and Diabetes

Doctors have known for years that type 2 diabetics have an increased incidence of periodontitis, or gum disease. In July 2008 the connection was further highlighted: Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health followed 9,296 nondiabetic participants, measuring their level of periodontic bacteria over the course of 20 years. "We found that people who had higher levels of periodontal disease had a twofold risk of developing type 2 diabetes over that time period compared to people with low levels or no gum disease," explains Ryan Demmer, PhD, associate researcher at the department of epidemiology at the Mailman School and the lead author. While more research is needed before doctors can conclude that gum disease actually leads to diabetes, there are already a few theories about why this might be the case: One proposes that when infections in your mouth get bad enough, they can lead to low-grade inflammation throughout your body, which in turn wreaks havoc on your sugar-processing abilities. "There are all kinds of inflammatory molecules," says Dr. Demmer, "and it's believed that maybe some attach to insulin receptors and prevent the body's cells from using the insulin to get glucose into the cell."

Oral Health and Heart Disease

As with diabetes, the connection between poor oral health and cardiovascular conditions has been recognized — the two are often found together — but it still hasn't been determined conclusively whether or not there is a direct causal relationship between them. (One reason is that there are a number of other potential risk factors — such as smoking and old age — that can lead both to gum disease and heart disease.) However, in a 2005 study funded by the NIH, 1,056 randomly selected participants with no prior heart attacks or strokes were evaluated for levels of periodontal bacteria: After removing the effects of the other risk factors of age, gender, and smoking, it was found that there was an independent relationship between gum disease and heart disease, says Moise Desvarieux, MD, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School and lead author of the study. One theory about why this may occur, says Dr. Desvarieux, is that small amounts of bacteria enter your bloodstream while you're chewing. "Bad" bacteria from an infected mouth may lodge itself inside blood vessels, ultimately causing dangerous blockages. Strengthening his theory is the fact that when scientists have looked at atherosclerotic blood vessels, they have sometimes found fragments of periodontal bacteria. Meanwhile, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2007 established that aggressive treatment of gum disease reduces the incidence of atherosclerosis within six months.

Pregnancy Complications and Gum Disease

For many pregnant women, gum infections stem from the fluctuating hormone levels that come with pregnancy, says Marsha Rubin, DDS, practicing diplomat of special-care dentistry at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, who sees many pregnant patients in her practice. Others neglect their oral care during pregnancy, since they have much on their minds, she adds. But that's a mistake: Scientists believe that gum disease or inflammation in the mouth possibly triggers an increase in a chemical compound called prostaglandin, which induces early labor. While this theory has not yet been confirmed, a 2001 study found that pregnant women who develop gum disease between weeks 21 and 24 are four to seven times more likely to give birth before week 37. There is evidence that poor gum health in the extreme can lead to low birth weight as well. A number of studies — including a 2007 study of 3,567 Turkish women and a 2007 study of 1,305 Brazilian women — found a relationship between periodontal disease, preterm birth, and low birth weight.

Pneumonia and Gum Disease

There has been a link established between poor oral health and pneumonia, though much of the research focuses on high-risk populations. A 2008 study of elderly participants found that the number who developed pneumonia was 3.9 times higher in patients with periodontal infection than in those free from it. "The lungs are very close to the mouth," says Rubin. "Even in a healthy mouth there is lots of bacteria, but bacteria in a not-healthy mouth can get aspirated into the lungs, causing pneumonia or aggravating COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder." Several intervention studies cited by the CDC show that an improvement in oral health can lead to a reduction in respiratory infection.

Pancreatic Cancer and Gum Disease

A study published in 2007 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute surveyed 51,529 American men about their health every two years between 1986 and 2002. Of the 216 participants who developed pancreatic cancer, 67 of them also had periodontal disease. Independent of the participants' smoking status, the study found that having a history of periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. This, according to the study, could be because of systemic inflammation or increased levels of carcinogenic compounds produced in the infected mouth. Interestingly, another viable theory about why gum disease may cause type 2 diabetes points to damage to the pancreas as well. "With the pancreatic cancer study, we thought it was very interesting that you have this localized infection that has an impact on a systemic organ that is very intimately tied to the pathophysiology of diabetes," says Dr. Desvarieux. Reasons for why this might be are as yet unknown.

 

 

August 21st, 2014

What are some foods that fight bad breath?

There’s nothing worse than meeting someone and realizing that your breath smells like your tuna lunch, stale coffee or worse. What you eat and poor oral hygiene are the two main causes of halitosis, or bad breath.


When you think about it, the mouth is a dirty worksite: more than 600 kinds of bacteria live in the average mouth. Many produce smelly gases as they digest the tiny food particles lodged between your teeth and on your tongue. Some of the most offensive gases produced by mouth bacteria are sulfur compounds, which are formed during the breakdown of proteins. Garlic and onion also contain many sulfur compounds. A proper oral-hygiene routine, which includes brushing, flossing, rinsing, tongue cleansing and regular visits to the dentist, is an important first step.

Do breath-freshening products work?

But even with good dental hygiene your breath can still stink. About $1 billion a year is spent on breath-freshening products like gum and mints. However, these only work to temporarily mask odors. Fortunately, there are a few foods you can add to your arsenal in the battle against bad breath.

If bad breath is a persistent problem, talk with your doctor. It could be a sign of a more serious condition.

1. Tea

For tea-rific breath, try a cup of tea. Studies suggest that drinking unsweetened black or green tea may help ward off bad breath. Both types of tea contain antioxidants called polyphenols that can help destroy the growth of bacteria that cause bad breath—although green tea contains more because it is processed in a different way. A study conducted at Pace University, for example, found that green tea extracts were effective at fighting several types of oral bacteria by preventing their growth. Polyphenols also reduce those nasty sulfur compounds.

2. Probiotic yogurt

Recent studies show that eating 6 ounces of unsweetened yogurt every day can reduce the level of odor-causing hydrogen sulfide in your mouth. The reason is that active cultures in yogurt, such asLactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, compete with the bacteria in your mouth that contribute to bad breath. Accumulation of plaque and development of periodontal disease were also reduced in the study’s yogurt eaters. Eat a cup of plain yogurt with active cultures and make sure to avoid varieties with added sugars. (Sugars allow for bacterial growth in the body and especially the mouth.)

3. Water

Wet your whistle—often. Most odor-causing bacteria are anaerobic, meaning they thrive in a dry mouth. Therefore, drinking water helps flush out food particles and bacteria stuck in your mouth. Drinking water also promotes the production of saliva, which acts as a cleansing agent.

 4. Parsley and basil

Nothing says stinky breath like garlic and onions. That’s because there are roughly 33 different smelly sulfur compounds that naturally occur in garlic and onions; they linger in your mouth and are absorbed in the bloodstream and expelled when you exhale. Parsley and basil help kick garlic breath. The polyphenols (compounds that act like antioxidants) in these herbs break down the sulfur compounds in garlic. For the biggest benefit, combine garlic and either basil or parsley in the same dish (think pesto!), though it may be possible to get the garlic-breath-fighting benefits of polyphenols by eating the herbs in dishes separate from the garlic, as long as they are consumed during the same meal.

5. Apples and spinach

While we can’t guarantee that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, research has shown that eating apples with garlic can mitigate garlic breath. (Think pork chops with apples and garlic-smashed potatoes. Or if the thought of garlic and apples together doesn’t sound appealing, follow a garlic-heavy dish with an apple.) The polyphenols found in apples break down the smelly sulfur compounds. Spinach is another polyphenol-rich food that is good at breaking down stinky sulfur compounds.

According to Sheryl Barringer, Ph.D., professor of food science and technology at Ohio State, the polyphenols in foods like spinach and apples should be mixed with garlic to break down the sulfur compounds. Luckily, spinach and garlic are delicious together.

6. Cherries and lettuce

According to nutritionist David Grotto, author of The Best Things You Can Eat, cherries and lettuce can also beat bad breath. Studies have shown that these two foods help remove the smell of methyl mercaptan, another odorous gas released by mouth bacteria as they digest bits of food.

 

 

August 19th, 2014

Healthy smile, healthy you: The importance of oral health

Regular dentist visits can do more than keep your smile attractive – they can tell dentists a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.

New research suggests that the health of your mouth mirrors the condition of your body as a whole. For example, when your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is good, too. On the other hand, if you have poor oral health, you may have other health problems.

Research also shows that good oral health may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring.

Gum disease and health complications

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease. Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.

Other research shows that more than 90 percent of all systemic diseases (diseases involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and excessive gum problems. Such diseases include:

Diabetes
Leukemia
Oral cancer
Pancreatic cancer
Heart disease
Kidney disease

Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first health care provider to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.


 July 30th, 2014

Tips for Those With Sensitive Teeth

 

Those with sensitive teeth are usually always in pain as this condition in dentistry manifests itself through when eating or drinking very hot or very cold things.  The pain can be sharp, shooting and you’ll feel it at the ends of your nerves. Sensitive teeth is cause when the underlying layer of teeth, called dentin, is exposed. Microscopic holes called tubules are found in the roots and lead to the pulp where all the nerves are. Usually, the tubules become exposed when the gum tissues recede and hot and cold or even overly sweet food can reach the nerve and cause pain. 


There’s many reasons why you may have sensitive teeth – it could be because the enamel has worn out due to brushing too hard, or eating too much acidic foods like citrus fruits, tea or tomatoes; it can be cause by gum disease or other gum-related conditions; it can even be caused by using the wrong kind of mouthwash or toothpaste. Whatever the cause, these are just some ways you can help with the pain of sensitive teeth.

Use Special Toothpaste and a Gentle Toothbrush: There are several types of toothpastes (i.e. Sensodyne, Prevident 5000, Fluoredex) on the market made especially for sensitive teeth. Usually, these work to desensitize your teeth, as well as help build up the lost enamel and cover up those tubules. Try different brands to find one that suits you best. Usually, whitening toothpaste and tartar control toothpaste can worsen the situation, so use fluoridated toothpaste instead. Also, before you go to bed, apply a layer of toothpaste on the exposed roots of your teeth. 

Prescription rinses and trays: There are a few specially compounded and formulated rinses that can be prescribed depending on the amount and type of sensitivity. Furthermore, our team can fabricate custom fitted trays to deliver the prescriptions to the most sensitive areas. Call or schedule a complimentary consult to see one of our team doctors.

Check your toothbrush – are the bristles too hard? This may cause the enamel to wear thin, so make sure you only use soft bristled brushes. 

Watch Your Diet: Certain foods can wear down the enamel in your teeth such as highly acidic foods. Starch and sugar left over in your mouth reacts with plaque, creating more acids. So, if you do eat any of these acidic, sugary or starchy food, make sure you brush your teeth as soon as possible. Also, be sure to watch your diet and eat nutritionally-rich foods for your overall and oral health.

Other Ways to Help Sensitive Teeth: Depending on the cause of your sensitive teeth, there may be other ways to deal with it. If you grind your teeth when you sleep, go to your dentist to get a mouth guard. If you live in a place that doesn't have fluoridated water, use special mouthwash and other products to compensate.

Maintaining good oral hygiene habits is the best way to prevent sensitive teeth and other dental problems. As a general rule, brush at least three times a day, floss regularly to maintain healthy teeth and gums and visit your dentist twice a year for regular check-ups.

 

 

July 24, 2014


Choosing a Toothbrush: Which one does our team recommend?

 

You can't overestimate the importance of good oral hygiene -- not only for dental health, but for your overall well being. In fact, gum disease is a major risk factor for the development of serious health conditions, including heart disease and diabetes.

From the time we're young, we're taught that using a toothbrush regularly is one of the best ways to keep our teeth and gums healthy. But which toothbrush is best?

In the late 1930s, when toothbrushes with nylon bristles were first invented, consumers choosing a toothbrush didn't have many options. Now, the story's completely different. Most stores that sell oral hygiene products now have an extensive collection of different types of toothbrushes on their shelves, including manual (disposable) and powered (electric) varieties.

General Tips for Choosing a Toothbrush

There are certain characteristics that you should look for in whatever toothbrush you choose, regardless of whether it is manual or powered.

Size. The best toothbrush head for you should allow you easy access to all surfaces of your teeth. For most adults, a toothbrush head a half-inch wide and one-inch tall will be the easiest to use and the most effective. Though there are larger toothbrush heads available, you may find that it is difficult to maneuver them to clean certain hard-to-reach areas, such as the sides and backs of your molars. The toothbrush should have a long enough handle so you can comfortably hold it in your hand.

Bristle variety. If you go to the drug store to purchase a manual toothbrush or a replacement head for your electric toothbrush, you will be able to select a toothbrush with soft, medium, or hard nylon bristles. For the vast majority of people, a soft-bristled toothbrush will be the most comfortable and safest choice. Depending on how vigorously you brush your teeth and the strength of your teeth, medium- and hard-bristled brushes could actually damage the gums, root surface, and protective tooth enamel. For even more tooth protection when you brush, be sure the bristles on the toothbrush you select have rounded tips.

Expert recommendation. To ensure your toothbrush has undergone rigorous quality control tests for cleaning effectiveness and safety, ask your dentist for a recommendation. Or look for manual or powered toothbrushes that have earned the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Approval. Our team strongly recommends the SONICARE toothbrush. They range in price from between $50 and $250. We strongly believe that the $100 Flexcare is the best bang for the buck. Our group feels that this brush (SONICARE Flexcare) cleans just as well as the most expensive model for more than half the price. Our center provides this brush to our patients for $99. See below for specifications about the SONICARE Flexcare:


In addition to satisfying these conditions, powered or electric toothbrushes bearing the seal also must undergo safety testing in an independent lab and prove through clinical trials that the toothbrush is safe for use on the tissues of the mouth and teeth, as well as any dental hardware that may be in place

 


July 16th, 2014

Coffee Can Decrease Tooth Decay?

 
Statistics show that 54% of Americans drink coffee daily. Some of these people know the benefits of coffee while others don’t. Some only drink to boost their energy levels without caring about any other benefits or risks. Coffee has numerous health benefits. However, do you know the effects it has on your teeth?

 

Dental Benefits of Drinking Coffee
The major benefit of drinking coffee is that it decreases tooth decay. According to several studies, when roasted coffee beans were tested against S. mutans (bacteria that causes tooth decay), the coffee beans turned out antibacterial against the S. mutans. The roasted coffee also prevented the bacteria from being absorbed in the teeth. The conclusion is that coffee does not prevent growth of the tooth decay bacteria but actually decreases the amount of the bacteria that sticks to teeth.

 

The study was carried out using four different types of coffee beans; roasted and unroasted Arabica and samples of roasted and unroasted Robusta. The results showed that all the sample types yielded similar results. The roasted samples were more active in reducing bacteria that sticks to the teeth than the unroasted ones.

 

Although coffee is known for staining teeth and causing discoloration, you can maintain white teeth through simple methods. For example, you can prevent staining by drinking coffee made from Arabica beans through a straw. Arabica coffee contains less staining agent than Robusta. When you drink from a straw, it is less likely that the coffee will get into contact with teeth. You can also mix your coffee with high fat milk which counteracts the staining agent. Finally, brush your teeth after taking coffee. If discoloration still occurs, visit a dentist for professional whitening or use home teeth whitening kits.

 

Coffee has its good and bad sides and should be taken in moderate amounts.

 

 

 


July 15th, 2014

Smiles And The Science Of Attraction

It’s Not So Much About Makeup And Primping

Women in many countries annually spend up to $8 billion on makeup. And, the average woman in those countries spends 20 minutes a day (or more) applying it. But according to a Wrigley Gum study where participants looked at thousands of photos of women smiling with makeup, smiling without makeup, not smiling with makeup, and not smiling without makeup, the study found that both men AND women think that a smile makes a person more attractive than makeup does (and it may save a woman 20 minutes a day)!

Smiles Literally Draw People Closer

Why are smiles so attractive to us? A smile is a “social cue”. It can signal apology, welcome, gratitude, or celebration. A smile means “you’re clear to approach” and we all react to it subconsciously.

Your Smile Ranks #1 In How You’re Initially Judged

Sometimes it’s unwise to judge a book by its cover, but the importance of a first impression is undeniable. A recent survey of over 5,000 singles found that both men (58%) and women (71%) judge the opposite sex MOST on their teeth.


Unfortunately, this is rough news for the 30% of people who are unhappy with their smiles. If you’re one of them, please  contact us to visit about things you can do to be more confident about your smile, whether you’re ready for something big or just looking for a small, subtle improvement.

Thanks for your trust in our practice! We appreciate you!

 

 

 


 July 7th, 2014


A healthy smile means healthy self-esteem! 
 
Smile more, feel more confident

A white smile doesn’t just indicate healthy teeth and gums; your dental health also plays a significant role in how confident you feel. Think about it -- if you’re self conscious about your smile you’re not going to feel very good about interacting with others. With that in mind, we turned to psychologist Ann Demarais, Ph.D., and dental hygienist Kristy Menage Bernie, to get the scoop on why having a great smile matters – and how to get your pearly whites looking their brightest.

Great smile = confidence

Research shows that the better you feel about your looks, the better you feel about yourself, explains Demarais. "When your teeth look white and sparkly, you can relax, be in the moment and laugh. You are more confident and radiant," she says, adding that the mere act of putting your mouth in the shape of a smile changes the blood flow to the brain and actually makes you feel happier. The fact that smiling itself boosts your mood has a further positive impact because smiling has a contagious effect. "When you smile, others are more likely to smile back, and are more drawn to you, thereby increasing your confidence and happiness even more."

Smiles and perception

You might not realize it but whether or not you're smiling can have a significant impact how others perceive you. Having a radiant smile sends a huge positive message to those around you, Demarais explains. It tells people that you are happy to be in their presence, and it creates an optimistic feeling in others. When you smile, people are more likely to assume you have positive qualities -- they perceive you as more sociable, trustworthy and intelligent, compared to when you aren't smiling. So whether you're at a party, in a job interview or simply walking down the street, the fact that you're smiling will work to your advantage.

Poor smile confidence

Being unhappy with your smile usually means you don't do it very often – which means you aren't reaping the benefits outlined above. People who avoid smiling usually do so because they are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth. They may feel that their teeth aren't as white as they'd like, or that their teeth have lost their youthful sheen, which can make them feel ashamed about the appearance of their smile. When this happens people fall out of the habit of smiling or they do a closed-lip grin, which comes across as awkward or not genuine. "Most people are not aware of how important a smile is in how others perceive them or in how they feel about themselves," says Demarais.

Best whitening options

There are really only two options for optimal, long-lasting tooth whitening – and both are achieved by seeing a dental professional, explains Bernie. The two options are in-office whitening with a light (such as Zoom!) or laser treatment, or professionally dispensed whitening gels for use in custom trays. It is critical to consult a dental professional before any whitening process, for a few reasons. Whitening agents can only work when external stains, plaque and tartar have been thoroughly removed (which your hygienist can do), and a visit to your dental hygienist and an examination by your dentist will assure that your teeth and gums are healthy, as well as provide you the best options to whiten your smile.

Daily smile care

Research has shown that using sonic power toothbrushes can maintain whitening results and keep surface staining from forming, Bernie says. And it turns out we need all the help we can get. Studies have confirmed that we tend to spend 24 to 60 seconds on our oral hygiene and a mere 10 to 20 percent of us floss regularly and effectively. "With those statistics, it is clear that power brushes will dramatically improve daily plaque removal," she says.

It's also important to avoid habits that will stain your teeth such as tobacco use and consumption of coffee, cola or other foods and liquids that cause the teeth to pick up stain. Bernie also stresses the importance of routine visits to your dental hygienist to remove hard tartar or stains, which will ensure that you not only have a white smile but also a healthy smile. Your hygienist will also be able to recommend an optimal whitening option for you.
 
 
 
 
 
 
June 27th, 2014

Did you know there is a link between Heart Disease and Gum Disease?

GUM DISEASE AND HEART DISEASE

HEART DISEASE

DiagramSeveral studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. While a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been proven, research has indicated that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease.

Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.

Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Your periodontist and cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures.

STROKE

Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke. In one study that looked at the causal relationship of oral infection as a risk factor for stroke, people diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were found more likely to have an oral infection when compared to those in the control group.

 
 
 
 June 20th, 2014

Are breath mints a good idea? Most bad breath is caused by bacteria in your mouth and on your tongue. The sugar from breath mints can feed the bacteria and make it worse! Don’t forget to brush your tongue each time you brush your teeth.

 
 
 

 

Breath mints can be effective to combat halitosise but only in the short-term, says Dr Leong Hon Chiew from Dr HC Leong Dental Surgeon. Still, pick your mints carefully, he says, as most are packed with a high sugar content, which actually encourages oral bacteria growth that can cause bad breath. The worst time to take mints: after dinner. “Often, people who take after-dinner mints will not drink water for a while, as they won’t want to lose that ‘fresh’ feeling,” says Dr Leong. “This dries out the mouth and throat, further encouraging bacterial growth.”

But if you must suck on a breath mint, Dr Leong says to look for oral strips. They dissolve faster and, hence, the sugar in them spends less time in contact with your teeth, potentially lessening the possibility of tooth decay.

Sugar-Free Mints - Not Your Best Option
What about mints that tout they’re sugar-free? Dr Leong Hon Chiew from Dr HC Leong Dental Surgeon has his doubts. “Xylitol is not a sugar, and is less damaging than sugar, but it is still a nutrient source for bacteria,” he says. Peppermint oil is also usually present, but it provides no antibacterial properties. It has a pleasant aroma that counts for its usefulness as a breath freshener. 

However, breath mints can’t be counted as part of the oral health regime. “In most cases, they don’t do any harm, but mints could make already present halitosis issues much worse,” he says.

Simple Solution 
Obviously, you can’t keep brushing 24/7 to keep the mouth funk away. The next best option: simply drink water. “This flushes away sugars, food particles and wets the mouth and throat,” recommends Dr Leong. Many of us don’t drink enough water throughout the  day for this cleansing effect to occur. So, skip the sodas.

Over-Brushing Can Make Bad Breath Worse
So you’ve got bad breath? Brushing more won’t hurt, but most cases of bad breath stem from other factors like a diet high in protein and fat, for instance. In fact, excessive brushing can be detrimental, as exposing the mouth to too much toothpaste actually dries it out, and can encourage bacterial growth instead of limit it. So, if you have to brush more, do it only with tap water – and without toothpaste or mouth rinses, says Dr Leong.

 
 
 
 June 1st, 2014

Advances in orthodontic technology make for faster, more comfortable treatment


Modern orthodontic practices have evolved considerably over the last 20 years. Back then, tooth extractions were all too frequent and large, traditional one-size-fits-all brackets and wires were the standard of care.

For orthodontic practitioners, adopting the latest technology can help you deliver an enhanced level of treatment and impressive results for your patients that can contribute significantly to a thriving practice. For general dentists, when it comes time to refer a patient to orthodontic treatment, look to specialists who have adopted the latest technology to ensure the favorable outcomes for your patients who trust and value your recommendation.

Certainly there still remains no substitute for the skill, experience, and education of a well-trained orthodontic practitioner. However, contemporary treatment philosophies are changing the way we treat the vast majority of patients. The improvements in tools and techniques enable us to achieve great results with far less discomfort and in a much shorter treatment time than was ever before possible, thanks to these landmark innovations in modern orthodontia.

Custom smile design

One of the most exciting new treatment philosophies to emerge in recent years is a unique method of indirect bonding combined with the use of custom-designed bracket and wires. Called Insignia, it is the first and only customized smile design system to incorporate 3-D treatment planning software as well as brackets and wires customized specifically for each patient.

The Insignia software converts a typical set of impressions into a precision 3-D virtual model of the patient’s teeth. The orthodontist can then make any modifications desired to achieve the ideal smile for that patient. The orthodontist can even show the final results to the patient. The brackets are manufactured and then placed on the teeth with the use of precision placement guides — or jigs — for the most accurate level of indirect bonding. A series of corresponding arch wires is also provided to work in conjunction with the customized brackets to maximize efficient tooth movement.

Moreover, it is often more comfortable for the patient compared with traditional braces and provides a truly customized smile, having been designed with the patient’s unique dental and facial features in mind.

Passive self-ligating braces

Perhaps one of the most radical changes in the orthodontic industry has been a new understanding of how friction and ligation forces work to affect tooth movement. Conventional twin brackets use elastic ligatures or steel wire ties to apply pressure to the bracket and move the tooth into place with the arch wire’s guidance. This system of traditional or active ligation results in significant friction between the wire and the bracket, requiring heavier forces to move the teeth. This often results in significant patient discomfort and slower treatment time.

Unlike traditional ligating systems, new passive self-ligating brackets use a slide mechanism that opens to allow the provider to place the wire inside and then close it, creating a slot where the wire is free to glide inside. This approach not only reduces friction and pressure, but also results in more effective forces that make treatment more comfortable for the patient. This new approach also yields much more impressive results — including the ability to alleviate crowding very often without the use of rapid palatal expanders and significantly eliminating the need for extractions.

Clear brackets and Clear Wires

The advent of clear tray-style aligners has attracted the attention of many patients who want to improve their smile but who would prefer to avoid the metal-mouth look of braces. However, the problem with clear aligners is that they are not effective for achieving significant tooth movement, and they often take much longer to work compared to regular braces.

To give patients the results they want with the esthetics they desire, innovative new clear brackets like the Damon Clear system are virtually invisible and highly resistant to staining and discoloring compared with other clear brackets on the market. These passive self-ligating clear brackets deliver the best of both worlds: precise, comfortable treatment with discreet appliances that work quickly and effectively to speed orthodontic treatment.

Like all medical technologies, the tools and techniques for modern orthodontic treatment are constantly evolving. These innovative advances enable dental professionals to deliver better results and greater comfort for the patient while improving practice efficiency and growth. By remaining aware of the latest technologies, orthodontic specialists are better equipped to help guide their patients in choosing the latest, most appropriate treatment options available to achieve their ultimate desired result. 

 
 
 
 
 
 May 15th, 2014 

Five Surprising Cavity Killers

Most patients are aware that brushing and flossing is the central defender of cavities. However, few people know about these foods, drinks, or tips that may help prevent cavities and tooth decay.

wineandcheese

1)   Cheese- Evidently, being cheesy isn’t always a bad thing. Casein, a protein included in cheese, increases calcium levels in the mouth. Because teeth already partially consist of calcium, salvia calcium helps mineralize teeth, which prevents cavities. This does not mean to eat 5 cheese sandwiches a day. However, cheese and crackers every now and then wouldn’t hurt. In fact, it might help!

2)   Sugar Free Gum- Believe it or not, chewing sugar free gum has been doctor recommended to avoid cavities for years. The reason – sugar free gum consists of a sugar substitute called “xylitol.” This isn’t the same teeth-rotting sugar substitute included in diet soda. Xylitol prevents cavities because bacteria cannot use it to grow or produce acid. Bacteria uses many components within the mouth as opportunities to spread, but xylitol is not one of those components.

3)   Dark Chocolate- Perhaps indulging isn’t as guilt-stricken as one would think. It turns out that dark chocolate contains cocoa beans with strong antioxidants that can prevent tooth decay. Tannins, the component in dark chocolate that give it its bitter taste, prevent oral bacteria from sticking to one’s teeth. The polyphenols in dark chocolate not only limit bacteria, but also work to cease bad breath by neutralizing microorganisms. Remember that DARK CHOCOLATE – not milk chocolate or white chocolate – is the cavity killer. Probably not a smart idea to add a Hershey’s bar as a side to your meal.

4)   Using a Straw- Carbonated beverages are never a wise choice regarding oral health. However, there is a way to limit cavity growth while consuming soda: using a straw. Using a straw and while not letting the soda hit your teeth reduces the chances of tooth decay and cavities. However, the best way to avoid cavities regarding soda is NOT DRINKING SODA.

5)   Red Wine- *For the 21+ only* While many believe that wine is an unfavorable drink for teeth due to the stain left behind, one study suggests otherwise. It was found that wine has many components that actively prevent tooth decay and cavities. This isn’t saying that one should excessively drink wine, and isn’t even proof that red wine is effective in fighting cavities. It merely says that wine consists of cavity fighting components. 


 
 May 14th, 2014

 

SMILE MORE,  FEEL MORE CONFIDENT

A white smile doesn’t just indicate healthy teeth and gums; your dental health also plays a significant role in how confident you feel. Think about it -- if you’re self conscious about your smile you’re not going to feel very good about interacting with others. With that in mind, we turned to psychologist Ann Demarais, Ph.D., and dental hygienist Kristy Menage Bernie, to get the scoop on why having a great smile matters – and how to get your pearly whites looking their brightest.

GREAT SMILE = CONFIDENCE

Research shows that the better you feel about your looks, the better you feel about yourself, explains Demarais. "When your teeth look white and sparkly, you can relax, be in the moment and laugh. You are more confident and radiant," she says, adding that the mere act of putting your mouth in the shape of a smile changes the blood flow to the brain and actually makes you feel happier. The fact that smiling itself boosts your mood has a further positive impact because smiling has a contagious effect. "When you smile, others are more likely to smile back, and are more drawn to you, thereby increasing your confidence and happiness even more."

SMILES AND PERCEPTION

You might not realize it but whether or not you're smiling can have a significant impact how others perceive you. Having a radiant smile sends a huge positive message to those around you, Demarais explains. It tells people that you are happy to be in their presence, and it creates an optimistic feeling in others. When you smile, people are more likely to assume you have positive qualities -- they perceive you as more sociable, trustworthy and intelligent, compared to when you aren't smiling. So whether you're at a party, in a job interview or simply walking down the street, the fact that you're smiling will work to your advantage.

POOR SMILE CONFIDENCE

Being unhappy with your smile usually means you don't do it very often – which means you aren't reaping the benefits outlined above. People who avoid smiling usually do so because they are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth. They may feel that their teeth aren't as white as they'd like, or that their teeth have lost their youthful sheen, which can make them feel ashamed about the appearance of their smile. When this happens people fall out of the habit of smiling or they do a closed-lip grin, which comes across as awkward or not genuine. "Most people are not aware of how important a smile is in how others perceive them or in how they feel about themselves," says Demarais.

BEST WHITENING OPTIONS

There are really only two options for optimal, long-lasting tooth whitening – and both are achieved by seeing a dental professional, explains Bernie. The two options are in-office whitening with a light (such as Zoom!) or laser treatment, or professionally dispensed whitening gels for use in custom trays. It is critical to consult a dental professional before any whitening process, for a few reasons. Whitening agents can only work when external stains, plaque and tartar have been thoroughly removed (which your hygienist can do), and a visit to your dental hygienist and an examination by your dentist will assure that your teeth and gums are healthy, as well as provide you the best options to whiten your smile.

DAILY SMILE CARE

Research has shown that using sonic power toothbrushes can maintain whitening results and keep surface staining from forming, Bernie says. And it turns out we need all the help we can get. Studies have confirmed that we tend to spend 24 to 60 seconds on our oral hygiene and a mere 10 to 20 percent of us floss regularly and effectively. "With those statistics, it is clear that power brushes will dramatically improve daily plaque removal," she says.

It's also important to avoid habits that will stain your teeth such as tobacco use and consumption of coffee, cola or other foods and liquids that cause the teeth to pick up stain. Bernie also stresses the importance of routine visits to your dental hygienist to remove hard tartar or stains, which will ensure that you not only have a white smile but also a healthy smile. Your hygienist will also be able to recommend an optimal whitening option for you.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
May 13th, 2014


Is removing your wisdom teeth wise?


Man’s jaw size has steadily decreased over time throughout evolution.  As our diets of raw meats and plants have evolved into more processed and cooked foods, the size of modern man’s jaw has decreased and the need for 32 teeth has decreased as well. These factors often cause our last set of molars known as your wisdom teeth to have no room to erupt properly in alignment with your gums and other teeth.  Some people genetically are missing one or more wisdom teeth.  Other people’s wisdom teeth stay completely impacted or buried in the jaw never erupting through the gum.  And yet other people (the majority) have wisdom teeth that partially erupt, never achieving a stable position or fully erupt in an unstable position.

This last scenario of wisdom teeth in an unstable position is the most damaging one often leading to the recommendation of removal.  Because of their aberrant position, they are difficult to keep clean.  This often leads to decay which cannot always be reached and repaired by your dentist.  More importantly, the inability to keep them clean causes localized gum or periodontal inflammation leading to bone loss in that area.  This bone loss compromises the functioning 2nd molar in front of your wisdom tooth.  This is the number one reason to remove wisdom teeth.  If these unstable teeth are left too long, you often will lose your 2nd molars as well because of the advanced bone loss.  In addition, these unstable wisdoms cause a forward pressure on your remaining teeth often causing the front teeth to become more crowded and rotate.

Fully impacted wisdom teeth need to be monitored with periodic x-rays to make sure that they are not causing damage to the 2nd molars which can silently happen in your jaw.  Sometimes these can be left alone and monitored but need close supervision.  Lastly, some people do have sufficient room in their jaw for full eruption of stable wisdom teeth.  As long as they are kept clean, they can be maintained.  So there is no short answer as to whether it is wise to remove your wisdom teeth.  The bottom line is that it is a very individual decision based on your particular clinical circumstances.

Thinking you might or are curious to know if you need your wisdom teeth removed? Make sure to ask one of our doctors. 

 
 
 
 
 
May 11th, 2014

 

Cosmetic Dentistry Isn’t Just Cosmetic


Sure, straight white teeth make your smile more beautiful, however cosmetic dentistry can improve your health as well! Straighter teeth that are properly aligned improve your bite relationship which distributes your biting forces more evenly throughout your mouth causing less premature wear of your enamel. 

Correcting crowded teeth, gapped teeth or overbites can lead to a more harmonious neuromuscular balance in your facial, jaw and head and neck muscles. Many common head and neck pain symptoms (sometimes referred to as TMJ or TMD “TemporoMandibular Disorder”) are related to imbalanced bite relationships. Properly spaced teeth also allow better bone support around your teeth. Crowded overlapped teeth crush the surrounding bone that supports the teeth and these teeth can be lost prematurely as you age due to increased bone loss.

Properly restoring teeth that have very large old leaky fillings with crowns or porcelain inlays make these teeth stronger, less decay prone and less prone to periodontal disease because they are easier to clean and keep plaque free.  Not only will these teeth look better but they will be stronger, healthier and easier to maintain.

Don’t forget that a more attractive smile will give you more confidence both personally and professionally so it can improve your psychological health and help you be more successful.


 
 
 
 February 22nd, 2104

The View - (ABC) - Whoopie Goldberg has a dental problem.

Whoopie Goldberg - THE VIEW (click here) 


 
 
February 18th, 2014
Should I Get Braces for My Child's Teeth, or My Own?
 

Orthodontic appliances – often thought of as braces – are used to straighten your teeth, so that they look and function better. These appliances apply gentle pressure to improperly aligned teeth to guide them, over a period of months or years, into a more proper position.

Braces are often thought of as something that only young people wear, and one of the reasons for this is that the optimum time for orthodontic treatment is between the ages of 10 and 14, before the structure of the teeth and gums have become fixed. However, people of any age can benefit from orthodontic treatment, and not for purely cosmetic reasons.

Other than improving the appearance of your smile, what do braces do?

Braces can be used to correct a number of dental problems, such as crooked, crowded, or protruding teeth, underbite, overbite (when the upper teeth are longer than usual), or overjet (when there is more space than usual between the front upper and lower teeth, also known as buck teeth) conditions, too much space (or gaps) between your teeth, and misalignments due to extra or missing teeth. Yes, these conditions can make you unhappy with your smile and your appearance, but all of these conditions – if left uncorrected – can become the source of much more serious dental problems. Teeth that are misaligned and that do not fit together properly can cause an improper bite, which makes it impossible to chew your food properly, and can cause wear on the misaligned teeth.

This wear can then become the cause of cracks in the teeth that escalate into cavities. If your teeth are overly crowded or crooked, that can also render them more difficult to keep clean with brushing and flossing, which again can lead to cavities. So orthodontic corrections arenot merely cosmetic; they have a very real preventative value in maintaining proper dental health.

What types of orthodontic treatments are available?

Adults may tend to remember "braces" as those ugly metal things that we had to wear for a year or so back in Junior High School, and that made us miserable. But dental technology has progressed since then, and now there are many options available, such as:

• Traditional braces – Also referred to as "fixed braces," these appliances consist of stainless steel or titanium brackets or bands that are attached to the individual teeth. The bands are inter-connected using wires or elastic bands that can be tightened over time to progressively move the misaligned teeth into a better position.

• Lingual braces – These types of braces (such as SureSmile QT or Incognito Braces) attach to the back of the teeth, and thus are not easily visible when you talk or smile.

• "Clear" braces – Many modern braces (such as Invisalign and ClearConnect) work the same way as traditional metal braces, but are made from a transparent plastic or ceramic material that makes them less visible and allows them to blend in with the natural color of your teeth. Some may be removable, so that you can wear them at home and at night, but remove them at other times.

• Customized treatment systems – Systems such as SureSmile use computers, 3D imaging, and even robotic devices to devise a custom treatment regimen for each patient.

Dental technology is constantly advancing, so new types of orthodontic treatment are being invented every day.

Which of these treatments is "best"

All have their advantages, and their disadvantages. Orthodontic treatment takes time; it can take months or years to correct misaligned teeth. One factor to consider is, of course, your child's appearance (or your own appearance) during the time that you wear the appliances. If you feel that traditional metal braces are acceptable and don't cause you to become self-conscious when you smile, they are often the least expensive option. Some of the other options, such as the clear braces or the lingual braces, don't have the disadvantage of being visible every time you open your mouth, but can take longer to work. Cost is also an important factor to weigh. Some orthodontic treatments are quite reasonable, and covered (especially for young people) by dental insurance, while others can be quite expensive.

Orthodontic treatment takes time, and you should take your time considering which option is best for your child, or for you. Visit a number of dental offices or read their websites to become aware of all of the options, their advantages and disadvantages, and their costs. Above all, you should be comfortable with the dentists or orthodontists and trust them; correcting improperly aligned teeth takes time, and during this period you will be visiting their offices every four to eight weeks so that the braces or other appliances can be adjusted.

 

 
 
February 16th, 2014

 Improve Your Smile: Cosmetic Dentistry 101

Today, cosmetic dentistry is more popular than ever, from whitening and shaping, to closing spaces and replacing teeth. And dentists have a wide array of tools and techniques at their disposal for improving the look of your smile.

Before deciding to undergo any cosmetic procedure, it's important to know the benefits and risks, and what you can expect during the process. Make sure you're clear about what it will cost, how much experience your dentist has with the procedure, and whether any special maintenance will be needed afterward.

Teeth Whitening

Over time teeth can become stained or discolored, especially after smoking, taking certain medications, or consuming foods and beverages such as coffee and tea. Using a chemical process, your dentist can bleach your teeth in one of two ways. He can do an in-office procedure, or provide you with a system to use at home.

Your dentist can create a custom mouthpiece that ensures the right amount of whitening solution reaches your teeth. You may find whitening at home more convenient. But it can take two to four weeks. In-office whitening can take place in one or more 45- to 60-minute visits.

Keep in mind, your teeth can become stained again if you continue exposing them to the same substances that originally stained them. Since whitening products are not meant to clean teeth, it is still important to continue practicing daily oral hygiene by brushing twice a day and flossing at least once a day.

Bonding

Bonding may improve how your teeth look if they have excess space between them, or if they are chipped, broken, stained, or cracked.

Dentists also use bonding materials to fill small cavities or to protect the exposed root of a tooth.

The dentist can usually do this procedure in a single office visit by applying an etching solution followed by tooth-colored materials -- sometimes composite resins -- directly to the tooth's surface where needed.

Although bonding can last for several years, it is more likely than other types of restorations to chip or become stained.

Veneers

These custom shells, made of porcelain or plastic, cover the front sides of the teeth to change their color and/or shape. Veneers can improve teeth that:

  1. Have spaces between them
  2. Have become chipped or worn
  3. Are permanently stained
  4. Are poorly shaped
  5. Are slightly crooked

Dentists often suggest veneers for some of the same problems that bonding addresses. Yet, the process for inserting veneers is not reversible like dental bonding, which can be removed.

Veneers are less expensive than crowns. And they last longer and have better color stability than bonding.

Before inserting veneers, the dentist first takes an impression of your tooth, then buffs the tooth before cementing the veneer in place. A beam of light helps harden the cement which secures the veneer to your tooth.

Porcelain veneers are made in a laboratory. So you would need a second visit to the dentist to have them inserted.

Crowns

Sometimes called caps, crowns completely cover a tooth, restoring a normal shape and appearance. You may need a crown to:

  1. Cover a misshapen or discolored tooth
  2. Protect a weak tooth
  3. Restore a broken or worn tooth
  4. Cover a tooth with a large filling
  5. Hold a dental bridge in place
  6. Cover a dental implant
  7. Cover a tooth that's had a root canal procedure

Crowns can be made from metal, porcelain fused to metal, resin, or ceramic materials. Because crowns are costly, dentists usually suggest them only when other procedures can't produce a pleasing result.

Sometimes a dentist can make an in-office same-day crown, or a temporary crown. But it takes more than one visit to receive a permanent crown. The dentist prepares the tooth for the crown, makes molds of the tooth, provides you with a temporary crown, and then places the permanent crown at a separate time.

Permanent crowns can have a long life if you take good care of them.

Enamel Shaping and Contouring

Enamel shaping and contouring involves removing or contouring dental enamel to improve the appearance of your teeth. Dentists may combine this process with bonding.

Often used to alter the length, shape, or position of teeth, reshaping and contouring can correct:

  1. Crooked or overlapping teeth
  2. Chipped and irregular teeth
  3. Minor bite problems

You may be a good candidate for reshaping and contouring if you have normal, healthy teeth, and there's still adequate bone between your teeth to support them.

Braces

Today, people of almost all ages are benefiting from braces. Braces not only improve the look of teeth that are crooked or crowded. They can improve an irregular bite and correct jaw positioning and jaw joint disorders.

Braces are worn to apply light pressure to the teeth and reposition them slowly, usually over the course of one to three years.

To place braces, your dentist or orthodontist bonds brackets made of metal, ceramic, or plastic to your teeth. Then she places arch wires through the brackets, which guide the teeth into their correct positions. Dentists can attach lingual braces to the backs of teeth, hiding them from view.

After your braces are attached -- and after each visit where your dentist tightens your braces -- expect some discomfort for a few days. Also, regular oral hygiene becomes especially important while you are wearing braces.

Risks with braces are minimal. But people with allergies to metal or latex, or those who have periodontal disease, are at greater risk for problems during treatment. Root shortening is also a minor problem for some people.

An alternative for correcting minor spacing problems involves wearing a series of clear, customized appliances called aligners, or invisible braces. Your dentist will reshape and replace them about every two weeks to progressively move your teeth. Unlike traditional braces, aligners can be removed while eating, brushing, and flossing.

Often there are two phases to treatment with braces: wearing braces, and then using a retainer to hold your teeth in their new position. Retainers can be removable or permanently bonded in behind your teeth.

Bridges

Sometimes called a fixed partial denture, bridges are used to replace missing teeth with artificial teeth. Bridges can be made of gold, alloys, porcelain, or a combination. Dentists anchor them onto surrounding teeth after preparing them for crowns. Then a false tooth joins to the crowns and the bridge is cemented onto the prepared teeth. Only your dentist can remove a fixed bridge.

The success of your bridge depends upon its foundation. So remember that oral hygiene to keep remaining teeth healthy is particularly important if you wear a bridge.

Implants

Implants are one of the more involved and expensive cosmetic dentistry procedures, but are a long-term solution for replacing missing teeth. They are an alternative to bridges -- which use adjacent teeth as anchors -- and to removable dentures, which rest on your gums. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon implants them surgically into the jawbone.

Implants have three parts:

  1. Titanium metal, which fuses to the jawbone
  2. An abutment, which fits over the part of the implant that sticks out from the gums
  3. The crown, which a special restorative dentist creates for a natural, tooth-like appearance

You can get an implant to replace a tooth. Or two or more implants can provide a stable support for replacing several teeth. If you have bone loss from periodontal disease or lost teeth, the surgeon will likely need to first graft bone so the implant has something to secure to.

Having implants requires several steps, including:

  1. A comprehensive exam, X-rays, and consultation
  2. Surgical implantation of the titanium posts
  3. Taking impressions of the upper and lower jaws
  4. Making a model for the creation of the dentures or crowns
  5. Placement of the crown
  6. Follow-up exams with members of your implant team

Other Periodontal Plastic Procedures

An array of other procedures can also improve your smile. They include procedures to help with:

  1. An uneven gum line
  2. Teeth that look too short or too long
  3. Exposed roots
  4. Indentations in your gums or jawbone

If problems like these are a concern for you, ask your dentist about your best options for correcting them and creating a smile that you can be proud of.

 


 

 

February 12th, 2014

 The Importance of Good Oral Hygiene

 

Oral hygiene incorporates many of the things we do on a day to day basis. These are such things as brushing our teeth, flossing, and using mouth wash. Most of us however do not recognise how important these things are for our overall health and think of them only as a way to keep our teeth clean and our breath smelling good. In reality, what causes us to have bad breath or sometimes to have bad teeth, is bacteria, and this bacteria can have any number of effects on the rest of our health. It might surprise you to learn, for example, that the number of times you floss, has been directly correlated to the development of cancer or stroke. This all makes it highly important to care for your oral hygiene.

Oral hygiene and personal health

Many people reading this may be confused as to how brushing your teeth and flossing could have any connection to cancer or strokes. The reason for this however is largely to do with your immune system, and if you have bacteria in your mouth then your immune system will be constantly battling it to prevent it from affecting the rest of your health. If it's doing this, then that elevates your blood pressure allows other viruses more of a window of opportunity to attack you. The mouth is the number on place where this is a problem, both because it is a warm and moist environment perfect for the spread of bacteria, and because it offers a direct passage to your stomach through which bacteria and germs can pass through into the blood. This then means that should you have the wrong bacteria in your mouth, it can easily travel into your stomach and result in a full blown illness. Another reason that the mouth is a particularly vulnerable area is also because of the range of things we put in there. For example we chew our fingers after touching things, we wipe our mouths and we eat food that is perhaps no longer that good for us.

At the same time good oral hygiene is important for other people's health and it shouldn't just be ourselves we're concerned about. This is true because when we cough or sneeze, we broadcast the bacteria and germs in our mouths around everyone else. While you should always keep your hand in front of your mouth, it's better to avoid having too much bacteria in their in the first place. And perhaps more importantly it should be good for when you are kissing your loved ones and particularly romantic partners.

Finally good oral hygiene is of course just good for your teeth and your breath, and these are not only aesthetic and important from a social point of view, but also important in order to ensure that you are don't suffer pain and that you can easily break your food down for consumption.

How to maintain good oral hygiene

Fortunately keeping on top of oral hygiene is something which is relatively easy and simple to do. First of all, you should be sure to drink lots of water. This will help your mouth to produce saliva, which is a natural disinfectant, and will also help you to literally wash out the inside of your mouth. Likewise you should of course be careful not to put things in your mouth that are likely to cause the spread of bacteria.

Brushing your teeth is also highly important of course and this will help you to scrape away bacteria as well as plaque, both of which will also be helped by the toothpaste. It makes most sense to brush after meals, but most people will only brush after their first and second meal for practicalities sake. Make sure whatever else you do, that you are certain to brush before or after breakfast – the reason being that we don't produce as much saliva in the night and that this can lead to the build up of bacteria. This is also why we often have bad breath first thing in the morning. Finally will help to clean in those difficult areas where a toothbrush can't reach, and as it's small enough to be carried around you can do this after every meal. However just doing it after every couple will of course be better than not doing it at all.

 


 

 

 January 17th, 2014

15 Myths and Facts About Cavities

 Check the myths and facts below to find out how cavities are caused, prevented, and treated.

1. Sugar Is the Prime Cause of Cavities

Myth, but it's almost a fact. 

The truth is, acid produced by bacteria in your mouth is the cause of cavities, says Kimberly A. Harms, DDS, an American Dental Association consumer advisor and former president of the Minnesota Dental Association. However, these bacteria are triggered to make acid when you eat anything with carbohydrates -- and sugar is a carb.  

Rice, potatoes, bread, fruits, and vegetables are also carbs.

Once the acid eats into your tooth, the bacteria “have a nice little hole to live in where your toothbrush and floss can’t reach,” says Harms. The bacteria continue to metabolize carbs and produce acids -- and your cavity just keeps getting bigger.

Here’s an important fact. It’s not the amount of carbs you eat that causes tooth decay, but the length of time your teeth are exposed. If you eat a lot of carbs for lunch, that’s one big exposure. But if you spend the day sipping sugary drinks, that’s continuous exposure -- and much more unhealthy for your teeth.

“We have a saying,” says Harms. “Sip all day and get decay.”

2. Exposure to Acidic Foods, Like Lemons, Causes Tooth Decay

Fact. Acidic foods such as lemons, citrus juices, or soft drinks don’t cause cavities, but they may be putting your enamel in danger.

"Acids can tear down your enamel and weaken your tooth," says Harms. “If you lose the enamel's protection and expose the underlying dentin, your tooth is now more prone to decay.”

3. Kids Are a Lot More Likely to Get Cavities Than Adults

Myth. With the help of sealants, fluoridated water, and preventive care, “we’ve actually cut decay in school-aged children by half in the last 20 years,” says Harms.

However, there’s been an increase in cavities in senior citizens “because they have some unique circumstances,” she says. Some medicines dry out the mouth, for example, reducing salvia. Saliva is vital in fighting tooth decay because it helps neutralize acids, has a disinfectant quality, washes away bacteria, and helps prevent food from sticking to your teeth.

4. Aspirin Placed Next to a Tooth Will Help a Toothache

Myth. Swallowing aspirin is what helps reduce toothache pain. Since aspirin is acidic, placing it beside the tooth can actually burn your gum tissue, causing an abscess. "So don’t do it," says Harms. "Always swallow the aspirin!"

5. All Fillings Eventually Need Replacing

Myth. An amalgam or composite filling needs to be replaced if it breaks down or a cavity forms around it, or if the tooth fractures, says Harms. If none of those problems occur, you can keep the same filling for life.

“Fillings do have a life expectancy,” says Harms, but it depends on things like tooth wear and oral hygiene habits. If you brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and floss and use a mouth rinse once a day, you’ll have less tooth decay and your fillings may last longer.

6. If You Have a Cavity, You'll Know It

Myth. “That’s a big, big, bad myth,” Harms says. Mild tooth decay doesn’t cause symptoms. The pain we associate with cavities comes when tooth decay is more advanced and causes damage to the nerve.

Allowing tooth decay to advance can “lead to much more expensive procedures, like root canals,” says Harms. That’s why regular dental checkups are so important. 

Also, once a cavity starts, it doesn’t repair itself. A cavity “will always grow once you get to a point where you can’t clean it out any longer.” Once decay gets into the dentin of the tooth -- below the enamel -- it just continues to grow.

7. Once a Tooth Is Treated, the Decaying Stops

Fact. “You can get decay later on in other areas of the tooth, but the particular decay that was taken out is gone.”

Once you get a cavity filled -- and if you maintain good brushing, flossing, and rinsing habits -- you typically won’t get decay in that spot again.

Harms adds one caveat: “Sometimes a filling gets old and the margins where it meets the tooth begin to break down or pull away, and because you can’t reach it to clean it out, bacteria can get in there and decay can begin again.”

8. Cavities Are More Likely Between Teeth

Fact. “Anywhere bacteria can hide that you can't, or aren't able to, reach with a toothbrush or floss is a likely place for decay,” says Harms. The deep grooves on the back of your front teeth are a good place for tooth decay, for example. “And yes, it can happen between teeth because the toothbrush won’t get in there and a lot of people have trouble flossing.” This is where using a mouth rinse with fluoride (also called an anti-cavity rinse) can give you extra protection.

9. Gaps in Teeth Encourage Cavities

Fact. If you have a small gap between your teeth and can’t clean it, you’re more likely to develop tooth decay there.

“Bigger gaps are easier to keep clean,” says Harms. So as long as they are free of bacteria, big gaps are less likely to develop tooth decay.

10. Chips and Cracks in Teeth Lead to Decay

Fact. If cracks and chips create a hiding place for bacteria, a spot where your toothbrush can't reach, those areas are more prone to tooth decay. Using a fluoride mouth rinse can reduce the risk of decay since it can flow into places your brush can’t reach.

“Lately we’re seeing more and more cracks in teeth because people are grinding,” Harms says. “Stress, worries about the economy, it makes some people grind their teeth more. ... Stress [management] can play an important role in tooth health.”

11. Sensitivity in Teeth Means You Have Decay

Myth. Tooth sensitivity could just mean you have hypersensitive teeth, or you have gum recession that's exposed some root.

You could also have a cracked or broken tooth or could need a root canal. “There are many things, including decay, that could lead to sensitive teeth,” Harms says.

12. Cavities Are the Only Reason for Root Canals

Myth. You need a root canal if the nerve inside a tooth is damaged. Untreated cavities may eventually lead to nerve damage, but there other causes, too.

“Cracks, fractures, or other types of trauma to the tooth can also cause nerve damage,” says Harms. In many cases “clenching and grinding can traumatize the tooth severely enough to need root canal therapy.”

13. Clenching and Grinding May Lead to Cavities

Fact. “Clenching and grinding is one of the most destructive things you can do to your teeth,” says Harms. With normal chewing, teeth touch for mere milliseconds, suffering very little stress. But clenching and grinding puts tremendous pressure on your teeth for extended periods.

That strain “can eventually cause damage and cracks and fractures of your teeth,” says Harms. If those fractures expose the weaker dentin, tooth decay can form at a faster rate. “Typically grinding and clenching lead to the need for crowns to restore the fractured tooth or root canal therapy to treat the traumatized nerve.”

14. You Don’t Need to Worry About Cavities in Baby Teeth

Myth. Baby teeth hold the space for permanent teeth. “If cavities are left untreated in baby teeth, they can develop into serious pain and abscesses. Occasionally the infection can spread to other areas of the body, and in rare occasions can even result in death,” says Harms.

15. Brushing, Flossing, and Rinsing Is the Best Way to Prevent Cavities

Fact. “Absolutely! Prevention is the key,” says Harms. You need to remove bacteria from teeth. Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, and floss and rinse daily. Antimicrobial rinses target bacteria, reducing plaque, bad breath, and the severity of gingivitis. Rinses with fluoride make teeth more resistant to decay. If bacteria are removed daily from every area of your tooth, “you won't get cavities,” says Harms.


  

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January 16th, 2014

Oral health: A window to your overall health 

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.
Your oral health is more important than you might realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums can affect your general health.
 

What's the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body's natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body's resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.
 

 

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January 13th, 2014

First Impressions Are Everything


 New Study Confirms People With Straight Teeth Are Perceived as More Successful, Smarter and Having More Dates

Findings back up the negative judgments about people with crooked teeth; Two in five Americans would not go on a second date with someone who has crooked teeth and more than half believe someone with crooked teeth would be less likely to land a job when competing with someone who has a similar skill set and experience.

"Whether we like it or not, we are often judged by our appearance," said Dr. Michelle Callahan, renowned TV host, relationship expert, coach, and development psychologist. "The results of this Smile Survey prove what I've always believed, which is the importance of an attractive, healthy smile, whether you're socializing and networking face-to-face or virtually. Your smile has more of an effect on what others perceive about you than you think."

According to the Kelton study, many Americans say teeth are a standout feature when it comes to what they notice and recall when first meeting someone. About two-thirds of Americans are more likely to remember attractive features than those they find to be unpleasant. Perhaps this is why so many realize a nice smile is important.

Given the emphasis placed on straight teeth, there is now a modern way for adults and kids to straighten their teeth that can be done without most people even knowing they are in treatment. Clear aligners such as Invisalign and Invisalign Teen® straighten teeth like metal braces, yet they are more comfortable, less intrusive to people's lifestyles and make maintaining good hygiene much easier because they are removable.
"There have even been studies that indicate lasting impressions are made within the first three seconds of seeing someone," said Dr. Callahan. "Many adults are concerned about how their smile might affect their chances for employment or advancement in a competitive job market. Many people are also reentering the dating scene after a divorce and are looking for a more attractive, youthful appearance."

A unique digital perception study, developed by Kelton Research contrasted images of men and women with straight and crooked teeth. The survey was taken by 1,047 nationally representative Americans. In the study, respondents were shown images of people with varying tooth issues and asked to give their honest opinion about them, unaware that they were comparing people with straight teeth to crooked teeth. Results of the study indicated Americans perceive people with straight teeth to have more desirable qualities than those with crooked teeth, including attributes such as being happy, surrounded by loved ones, and professionally successful.

The perception study reinforced the affect crooked teeth can have on one's social life and how they are perceived by others, including:
Making a Lasting impression: It's important to have attractive teeth as part of a smile because pearly whites make a lasting first impression. Nearly one-third (29%) of Americans say the first aspect of someone's face they typically notice is his or her teeth, and 24% say this is also the facial aspect that they remember the most after meeting someone.

Straight Teeth = Success: These thoughts also extend to perceptions regarding an individual's potential for professional and financial success. When looking at images, Americans perceive those with straight teeth to be 45% more likely than those with crooked teeth to get a job when competing with someone who has a similar skill set and experience. They are also seen as 58% more likely to be successful, as well as 58% more likely to be wealthy.

Love at First Sight: Not if you have crooked teeth. When it comes to attracting a possible mate on a dating site, those with straight teeth are seen as 57% more likely than those with crooked teeth to get a date based on their picture alone.
Crooked Teeth = Dull Social Life: Nearly two in five (38%) Americans would consider not going on a second date with someone who has misaligned teeth. Far fewer would ditch someone who lives with his or her parents (23%).

Straight Teeth = Good Personality: People connect more positive descriptions with men and women who have straight teeth than those who have crooked teeth. Those with straight teeth are 21% more likely to be seen as happy, 47% more likely to be viewed as being healthy and 38% more likely to be perceived as smart. 
A Nice Smile Goes a Long Way: Nearly three in four (73%) Americans would be more likely to trust someone with a nice smile than someone with a good job, outfit, or car. 

The Want List: Having an attractive smile is something important to many Americans. Close to three in five (57%) Americans would rather have a nice smile than clear skin. What's more, 87% would forego something for a year in order to have a nice smile for the rest of their life; more than one-third of these folks would give up dessert (39%) or vacations (37%). "Many people tend to focus on fixing the things about themselves they think will have the biggest impact, often overlooking one of the most impressionable physical attributes like their teeth," said Timothy A. Mack, senior vice president of business development for Align Technology, maker of Invisalign. "We live in a society where looking good heavily impacts how we are perceived. You can say you're not supposed to judge a book by its cover, but people do it every day."


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January 11th, 2014

7 Surprising Ways You're Ruining Your Teeth

You only get one set of teeth, and repair costs more than prevention. So be kind to your teeth. Here are some mistakes you may not know you're making.

1. Brushing Too Hard 
"If you brush too vigorously, you can wear away at your enamel and cause sensitivity and even gum recession," says dentist Nuntiya Kakanantadilok, director of the division of pediatric dentistry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Buy a brush with soft bristles and move it in small circles, not side to side, she says.

2. Eating too Many Acidic Foods 
"They can wear away enamel," says Kakanantadilok. That's a problem because that top protective layer of the teeth can never grow back. Nerves below it lose their protection, and you may start to feel pain from hot or cold. Some acidic, erosion-causing culprits: regular (and diet) soda, orange juice, wine, sports drinks, sour gummy candies, and lemons. "Think about your tooth as a seashell," says dentist Martha Ann Keels, division chief for pediatric dentistry at Duke Children's Hospital. "If you put a seashell in Coke, it will disappear."
If you can't resist these dental no-no's, at least neutralize the pH in your mouth by consuming water or cheese with them, says Keels. And instead of swishing acidic drinks around your in mouth, use a straw to limit contact with teeth, says dentist Richard H. Price, an American Dental Association consumer adviser.

3. Too Much Teeth Whitening 
It's normal to want pearlier whites. After all, says Price, "As we get older, teeth get darker." But don't overdo it. "Basically, you're exposing your teeth to a very mild acid," says Kakanantadilok. "Excessive bleaching can weaken enamel. Over time, even mild acid can begin to erode the mineral content of the tooth, causing the enamel to become porous and eventually to break down and become more sensitive."
Kakanantadilok says over-the-counter white strips are milder than in-office bleaching systems. And who wants teeth that look like Chiclets gum, anyway? "We try to educate people that 'normal' tooth color is not white but more ivory," says Paul Casamassimo, director of the Pediatric Oral Health Research and Policy Center for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

4. Chasing Hot Pizza With a Cold Drink 
When you bite into a piece of hot pizza, you're expanding your enamel. "Then you take a big dose of cold cola, not with a straw, and you're going to cause contraction," says Price. That can create what's called a "craze line" -- a vertical, hair-thin crack in the enamel that can lead to breaks and stains. "It would be similar to what happens to a porcelain plate that goes from hot to cold," says Price.
"Teeth will contract or expand with changes in temperature," says Casamassimo. "When that happens, if it's done too quickly, it's damaging." One solution: Like Price, eat hot pizza with a knife and fork.

5. Using the Wrong Toothpaste 
Pick one that's not too abrasive: The FDA rates toothpastes using a "relative dentin abrasion" (RDA) scale. Anything above 100 is considered abrasive, above 150 is highly abrasive, and above 200 is not recommended, says Kakanantadilok. For your reference: Colgate Total gets 70, Colgate Baking Soda & Peroxide Whitening Toothpaste gets 145, and Arm & Hammer Dental Care PM gets 168.
Use toothpaste with fluoride: The mineral can't re-grow enamel, but it plays a big role in making teeth stronger. "It's like putting on a protective raincoat or waxing your car," says Keels.

6. Using Them As a Tool 
You might think this sounds crazy, but lots of people do this absent-mindedly. "The teeth are meant to chew foods and look pretty when you smile, not to open up candy wrappers or chomp down on ice cubes," says dentist Warren Brill, president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.
If you use your chompers to open nail polish bottles, beer bottles, or anything else, you can cause micro-fractures that may not be apparent for years, says Kakanantadilok. Such abuse can also cause teeth to break or fillings to pop out.

7. Not Brushing and Flossing Enough 
Some people think this is enough -- some people are wrong. Brush for two minutes a day, twice a day. Otherwise, you increase the odds that you'll get cavities, which, if untreated, can spread into the jaw and cause infections. If you're at work and can't get to your toothbrush, a good solution is to keep a box of dental floss in your purse or drawer. "Floss first, if that's all you can do," says Keels.




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January 9th, 2014

8 Ways to Keep Your Mouth Healthy


Brushing, flossing, and rinsing are the ABCs of oral health, but they're only the beginning. A marvelous mouth takes more than squeezing paste out of a tube -- think improving your toothbrushing technique, ditching the daily soda habit, and saying good-bye to cigarettes.

1. Pay a visit. If you're prone to ditching the dentist, you're among the roughly 50% of adults in the United States who don't see a dentist yearly because of dental phobia, finances, or just plain neglect. But spend some quality time with your dentist (twice a year, the American Dental Association advises), and you'll catch problems such as decay, gum disease, trauma, or cancer at an early stage when they're treatable, not to mention more affordable to take care of.

2. Count the years. Toddlers and older adults tend to fly under the dental health radar, but they need mouth maintenance just like the rest of us. Children should see a dentist by the time they're 1, and until they are coordinated enough to tie their own shoes they'll need help cleaning their teeth. Older folks have their own oral issues. Arthritis can make brushing and flossing challenging, and as people age, the amount of saliva they produce decreases, which means more tooth decay and also discomfort for those who wear dentures.

3. Can the soda. Fizzy is fun but also part of the reason soda is so bad for your teeth. Two ingredients -- phosphoric acid and citric acid -- give soda its "bite" but also eat away at the surface of your teeth. Although the occasional soda won't hurt, a can or more a day makes your tooth enamel softer and more susceptible to cavities. Switch to water instead, adding flavor with sliced citrus or crushed berries or mint leaves.

4. Don't sugarcoat it. Sugar is a major culprit in tooth decay. It fuels bacteria and acidity in your mouth, causing plaque to form and eat away at your enamel and gums. Your pearly whites are hit with up to 20 minutes of acid production for every sugar fest you indulge in, from sweetened coffee in the morning to ice cream at night. To avoid being among the 20% of people in the United States who face tooth decay every time they look in the mirror, try to cut down on sugary treats, and aim to brush and floss after every meal or snack.

5. Pack it in. You've heard it before: Quit smoking. But this time, it's your dentist talking. The nicotine and tar in cigarettes not only turn your teeth an unsightly shade of yellow, they eat away at your gums. Smoking creates a ripe environment for bacteria and plaque on your teeth and along the gum line. That harms tissue, degrades the bone that supports teeth, and, eventually, increases your risk of tooth loss. Even worse, tobacco chemicals can lead to oral cancer.

6. Use the right toothbrush. You want a brush with soft bristles. With the right technique, it should last two to three months. It's ready to be replaced when you notice bent bristles, but don't wait that long. Even a straight bristle tip can become blunted instead of rounded and cause injury to the teeth and gums.

7. Practice proper technique. Although you probably know you should brush your teeth at least twice a day, if you're like most people, you don't give much thought to how to do it. Hold the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle, pointed toward the gum line, and use gentle, short, circular motions. Brush each tooth 10 to 15 times, but don't overdo it. Overly aggressive brushing can damage teeth and erode your gum line.

8. Finesse flossing. It's simple: Flossing fosters healthier teeth and gums. But like brushing, there's a right and wrong way because flaws in your flossing can cause friction and damage the gum line. Wrap about a foot of floss around your index fingers, keeping about two inches between your fingers to work with. Unroll a fresh section of floss for each tooth, and keep the floss tight against the tooth to break up plaque while leaving your gums in good shape.


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January 6th, 2014

5 Tips for Whitening Your Teeth

A bright white smile is a must-have accessory. We enlisted Steve Clark of teeth whitening system Opalescence, Inc. to share his top tips for getting a show-stopping smile. Read on and then break out that bright pink lipstick, ladies!

Consult Your Dentist: Before you start any sort of teeth whitening regimen, Clark recommends that you contact your dentist to get the scoop on the different options. "Your dentist can also make sure that your teeth are in the optimal condition to start whitening," he explains. Meaning: no cavities. 

Check the Ingredients: Not all teeth whitening systems are made equal! It's important to examine the products. "Look for potassium nitrate and fluoride to help reduce any potential tooth sensitivity."

Be Patient: Not everyone bleaches at the same rate, so don't get disheartened if you don't see results right away. "Some systems also take longer than others, so the best practice to be consistent and remain committed to the process," Clark advises. Some habits like drinking red wine or smoking will also determine how often you're going to need a touch-up treatment.

Go for a Gel: While many products claim to have whitening results, only a gel will actually be able to whiten beyond surface stains.

Examine Your Lifestyle: Always remember, when it comes to choosing a whitening procedure, there's no such thing as one "correct" solution. "There are options that fit different lifestyles from an in-office treatment to treatments that last five to ten days at 30 minutes per treatment," Clark explains. Find the solution that fits your lifestyle the best!



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January 5th, 2014

7 Surprising Ways You're Ruining Your Teeth


You only get one set of choppers, and repair costs more than prevention. So be kind to your teeth. Here are some mistakes you may not know you're making.

1. Brushing Too Hard 
"If you brush too vigorously, you can wear away at your enamel and cause sensitivity and even gum recession," says dentist Nuntiya Kakanantadilok, director of the division of pediatric dentistry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Buy a brush with soft bristles and move it in small circles, not side to side, she says.


2. Eating too Many Acidic Foods 
"They can wear away enamel," says Kakanantadilok. That's a problem because that top protective layer of the teeth can never grow back. Nerves below it lose their protection, and you may start to feel pain from hot or cold. Some acidic, erosion-causing culprits: regular (and diet) soda, orange juice, wine, sports drinks, sour gummy candies, and lemons. "Think about your tooth as a seashell," says dentist Martha Ann Keels, division chief for pediatric dentistry at Duke Children's Hospital. "If you put a seashell in Coke, it will disappear."
If you can't resist these dental no-no's, at least neutralize the pH in your mouth by consuming water or cheese with them, says Keels. And instead of swishing acidic drinks around your in mouth, use a straw to limit contact with teeth, says dentist Richard H. Price, an American Dental Association consumer adviser.

3. Too Much Teeth Whitening 
It's normal to want pearlier whites. After all, says Price, "As we get older, teeth get darker." But don't overdo it. "Basically, you're exposing your teeth to a very mild acid," says Kakanantadilok. "Excessive bleaching can weaken enamel. Over time, even mild acid can begin to erode the mineral content of the tooth, causing the enamel to become porous and eventually to break down and become more sensitive."
Kakanantadilok says over-the-counter white strips are milder than in-office bleaching systems. And who wants teeth that look like Chiclets gum, anyway? "We try to educate people that 'normal' tooth color is not white but more ivory," says Paul Casamassimo, director of the Pediatric Oral Health Research and Policy Center for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

4. Chasing Hot Pizza With a Cold Drink 
When you bite into a piece of hot pizza, you're expanding your enamel. "Then you take a big dose of cold cola, not with a straw, and you're going to cause contraction," says Price. That can create what's called a "craze line" -- a vertical, hair-thin crack in the enamel that can lead to breaks and stains. "It would be similar to what happens to a porcelain plate that goes from hot to cold," says Price.
"Teeth will contract or expand with changes in temperature," says Casamassimo. "When that happens, if it's done too quickly, it's damaging." One solution: Like Price, eat hot pizza with a knife and fork.

5. Using the Wrong Toothpaste 
Pick one that's not too abrasive: The FDA rates toothpastes using a "relative dentin abrasion" (RDA) scale. Anything above 100 is considered abrasive, above 150 is highly abrasive, and above 200 is not recommended, says Kakanantadilok. For your reference: Colgate Total gets 70, Colgate Baking Soda & Peroxide Whitening Toothpaste gets 145, and Arm & Hammer Dental Care PM gets 168.
Use toothpaste with fluoride: The mineral can't re-grow enamel, but it plays a big role in making teeth stronger. "It's like putting on a protective raincoat or waxing your car," says Keels.

6. Using Them As a Tool 
You might think this sounds crazy, but lots of people do this absent-mindedly. "The teeth are meant to chew foods and look pretty when you smile, not to open up candy wrappers or chomp down on ice cubes," says dentist Warren Brill, president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.
If you use your chompers to open nail polish bottles, beer bottles, or anything else, you can cause micro-fractures that may not be apparent for years, says Kakanantadilok. Such abuse can also cause teeth to break or fillings to pop out.

7. Not Brushing and Flossing Enough 
Some people think this is enough -- some people are wrong. Brush for two minutes a day, twice a day. Otherwise, you increase the odds that you'll get cavities, which, if untreated, can spread into the jaw and cause infections. If you're at work and can't get to your toothbrush, a good solution is to keep a box of dental floss in your purse or drawer. "Floss first, if that's all you can do," says Keels.



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January 2nd, 2014

A HEALTHY SMILE MEANS MORE SELF-ESTEEM


SMILE MORE, 
FEEL MORE CONFIDENT
A white smile doesn’t just indicate healthy teeth and gums; your dental health also plays a significant role in how confident you feel. Think about it -- if you’re self conscious about your smile you’re not going to feel very good about interacting with others. With that in mind, we turned to psychologist Ann Demarais, Ph.D., and dental hygienist Kristy Menage Bernie, to get the scoop on why having a great smile matters – and how to get your pearly whites looking their brightest.

GREAT SMILE = CONFIDENCE

Research shows that the better you feel about your looks, the better you feel about yourself, explains Demarais. "When your teeth look white and sparkly, you can relax, be in the moment and laugh. You are more confident and radiant," she says, adding that the mere act of putting your mouth in the shape of a smile changes the blood flow to the brain and actually makes you feel happier. The fact that smiling itself boosts your mood has a further positive impact because smiling has a contagious effect. "When you smile, others are more likely to smile back, and are more drawn to you, thereby increasing your confidence and happiness even more."

SMILES AND PERCEPTION

You might not realize it but whether or not you're smiling can have a significant impact how others perceive you. Having a radiant smile sends a huge positive message to those around you, Demarais explains. It tells people that you are happy to be in their presence, and it creates an optimistic feeling in others. When you smile, people are more likely to assume you have positive qualities -- they perceive you as more sociable, trustworthy and intelligent, compared to when you aren't smiling. So whether you're at a party, in a job interview or simply walking down the street, the fact that you're smiling will work to your advantage.

POOR SMILE CONFIDENCE
Being unhappy with your smile usually means you don't do it very often – which means you aren't reaping the benefits outlined above. People who avoid smiling usually do so because they are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth. They may feel that their teeth aren't as white as they'd like, or that their teeth have lost their youthful sheen, which can make them feel ashamed about the appearance of their smile. When this happens people fall out of the habit of smiling or they do a closed-lip grin, which comes across as awkward or not genuine. "Most people are not aware of how important a smile is in how others perceive them or in how they feel about themselves," says Demarais.

BEST WHITENING OPTIONS

There are really only two options for optimal, long-lasting tooth whitening – and both are achieved by seeing a dental professional, explains Bernie. The two options are in-office whitening with a light (such as Zoom!) or laser treatment, or professionally dispensed whitening gels for use in custom trays. It is critical to consult a dental professional before any whitening process, for a few reasons. Whitening agents can only work when external stains, plaque and tartar have been thoroughly removed (which your hygienist can do), and a visit to your dental hygienist and an examination by your dentist will assure that your teeth and gums are healthy, as well as provide you the best options to whiten your smile.

DAILY SMILE CARE

Research has shown that using sonic power toothbrushes can maintain whitening results and keep surface staining from forming, Bernie says. And it turns out we need all the help we can get. Studies have confirmed that we tend to spend 24 to 60 seconds on our oral hygiene and a mere 10 to 20 percent of us floss regularly and effectively. "With those statistics, it is clear that power brushes will dramatically improve daily plaque removal," she says. It's also important to avoid habits that will stain your teeth such as tobacco use and consumption of coffee, cola or other foods and liquids that cause the teeth to pick up stain. Bernie also stresses the importance of routine visits to your dental hygienist to remove hard tartar or stains, which will ensure that you not only have a white smile but also a healthy smile. Your hygienist will also be able to recommend an optimal whitening option for you.

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December 30th, 2013

GOOD IMPRESSIONS: A nice smile is an important asset in your professional life.


There is an old saying that a good smile “warms hearts and opens doors.”

A smile is one of the first things that others see about us. It’s one of the things that make the first impression of you in the minds of others. So it makes sense that you want your smile to be the best that it can be. Yet many people are very unhappy with their smile and are embarrassed to smile. There is a strong correlation between having bad teeth and low self-esteem. Yellow, crooked or missing teeth can affect your professional life dramatically, as it can reduce your confidence. It’s difficult to assume a leadership role when your confidence level is low.

In fact, a recent poll of 1,000 people between 18 and 50 years old showed the importance of a healthy looking smile. The poll questioned how people view the importance of a smile in various areas of life. The major findings of this poll were that, overwhelmingly, teeth were the major facial feature that people wanted to change. Other results showed that a good smile can have a dramatic effect on job interviews, meeting a new partner, making new friends and having a polished and confident professional look.

In the professional world:

A warm expression can make you appear much more approachable and friendly.

A smile is an effective icebreaker.

A smile can be contagious and may evoke a similar expression from the person you are meeting.

The good news is that it’s relatively simple these days to get a smile you can be proud of. Dentists offer quick, simple and painless treatments. Teeth whitening, tooth implants, crowns, and other cosmetic and restorative dentistry now days are performed in as little as one day. For those for whom cost plays an important factor, many dentists now take insurance, or offer payment plans. There are even companies that offer credit plans for dental work.

If you’re one of the many professionals who would like to improve their smile, and, as a result, their self-confidence, call your dentist today and speak with him or her about your concerns. Remember, a beautiful smile can make the difference in your personal and in your professional world. They say the eyes are the mirror to the soul; but a beautiful smile is a reflection of your self confidence.







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December 28th, 2013

What does your smile say about you?


Want to succeed in business, fill up your social calendar, and get more romance into your life? One secret may be in your smile.

Your smile -- simple, straightforward, and most important, sincere -- can attract more than admiring looks. A smiling face tells people that you’re an outgoing and intelligent person worth getting to know. 

"When someone has a big smile, it shows they’re willing to open up and expose a part of themselves," says Pamela McClain, DDS, president of the American Academy of Periodontology. Over the long term, smiling can benefit your health, perception at work, social life, and romantic status. With that much at stake, it's worthwhile to discover what your smile is saying about you -- and how to interpret the smiles flashed your way.

Smiling Eyes Aren't Just for the Irish

Many Americans look at the mouth to judge a person’s mood, but people smile for all sorts of reasons: anger, fear, embarrassment, confusion, to deceive. It’s really your eyes that give you away.

The muscles around the eyes can’t be forced to look happy. When people smile for real, their cheeks rise and the skin around their eyes bunches up. In fact, in certain countries where suppressing emotion is a cultural norm, people look more at each other’s eyes to gauge emotion.

A Smile Makes You Look Successful

"A smile conveys confidence and professionalism," says Lily T. Garcia, DDS, DDS, MS, FACP, president of the American College of Prosthodontists. People who project a positive outlook are generally more open and flexible. They tend to cope better with challenges than people who are withdrawn and unsmiling.

A study that followed a group of women for 30 years shows the lifetime benefits of smiling. The women who displayed genuinely happy smiles in their college yearbook photos went on to have happier marriages and greater wellbeing.

In the same study, a group of strangers looked at the college photos and reported their assumptions about the women’s personalities. The women who smiled were judged to be more positive and competent than those who didn’t.

Turn that Frown Upside Down

Want to be happy? Just smile. Believe it or not, forcing yourself to smile can actually make you happier.

Paul Ekman, PhD, a psychologist who is an expert in facial expressions, taught himself to arrange the muscles in his face to make certain expressions. To his surprise, he found himself feeling the emotions that he was mimicking. When he raised his cheeks, parted his lips, and turned the corners of his mouth up, he felt happier.

Ekman and his research partner went on to do a study of college students to see if they, too, would feel happier by making themselves smile. The researchers measured the students’ brain activity while the students followed instructions to smile using the muscles in their cheeks and around their mouths.

Whether the students smiled spontaneously or on purpose, the activity in their brains was virtually the same. They felt happy.


Smile Anxiety

Chipped or missing teeth, fillings, or discolored teeth are unveiled when your lips part to smile – so some people simply avoid it.

If you find yourself wanting to cover up your smile, you could be holding yourself back in more ways than you realize. "Life is much more challenging for people who are so self-conscious about their teeth they don’t want to smile," McClain says. Make a date with your dentist to talk about your concerns and potential corrections. Many dental problems can be fixed.

One of McClain’s patients with excess gum tissue was ashamed of her short-looking teeth. "We did a procedure called crown lengthening, and it was amazing what a difference it made,” McClain says. “She was so much more self-confident."


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December 26th, 2013

Healthy smile, healthy you: The importance of oral health

Regular dentist visits can do more than keep your smile attractive – they can tell dentists a lot about your overall health, including whether or not you may be developing a disease like diabetes.

New research suggests that the health of your mouth mirrors the condition of your body as a whole. For example, when your mouth is healthy, chances are your overall health is good, too. On the other hand, if you have poor oral health, you may have other health problems.

Research also shows that good oral health may actually prevent certain diseases from occurring.

Gum disease and health complications

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, there is a relationship between gum (periodontal) disease and health complications such as a stroke and heart disease. Women with gum disease also show higher incidences of pre-term, low birth-weight babies.

Other research shows that more than 90 percent of all systemic diseases (diseases involving many organs or the whole body) have oral manifestations, including swollen gums, mouth ulcers, dry mouth and excessive gum problems. Such diseases include:

Diabetes
Leukemia
Oral cancer
Pancreatic cancer
Heart disease
Kidney disease
Since most people have regular oral examinations, their dentist may be the first health care provider to diagnose a health problem in its early stages.

Poor oral health can lead to problems


If you don't take care of your teeth and gums, your poor oral hygiene can actually lead to other health problems, including:

Oral and facial pain. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, this pain may be largely due to infection of the gums that support the teeth and can lead to tooth loss. Gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease, and advanced gum disease affect more than 75 percent of the U.S. population.
Problems with the heart and other major organs. Mouth infections can affect major organs. For example, the heart and heart valves can become inflamed by bacterial endocarditis, a condition that affects people with heart disease or anyone with damaged heart tissue.
Digestion problems. Digestion begins with physical and chemical processes in the mouth, and problems here can lead to intestinal failure, irritable bowel syndrome and other digestive disorders.
What you can do

Seeing a dentist regularly helps to keep your mouth in top shape and allows your dentist to watch for developments that may point to other health issues. A dental exam can also detect poor nutrition and hygiene, growth and development problems and improper jaw alignment. Provide your dentist with a complete medical history and inform him or her of any recent health developments, even if they seem unrelated to your oral health.

At home, you can practice good oral hygiene:

Brush for two to three minutes, at least twice a day, with fluoridated toothpaste.
Floss daily to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can't reach.
Eat a healthy diet to provide the nutrients necessary (vitamins A and C, in particular) to prevent gum disease.
Avoid cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, which may contribute to gum disease and oral cancer.
Exercise preventive care and schedule regular dental checkups — the surest way to detect early signs of periodontal disease.


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December 22nd, 2013

Health Benefits From Smiling

A good smile can brighten up the room. People who frequently smile are perceived to be more in control, at ease and attractive than those who don't ( (Lau, 1982). However, a genuine smile may do more than just improve your appearance. New research has found a strong connection between smiling and your general health and well-being.

Good Feelings
Smiling can lift your spirits. A study conducted by the British Dental Health Foundation showed the act of smiling to dramatically improve one's mood. Dr. Nigel Carter, foundation CEO, stated "We have long been drawing attention to the fact that smiling increases happiness both in yourself and those around you, so it is good to receive the backing of this scientific research. A healthy smile can improve your confidence, help you make friends and help you to succeed in your career."

Affect on Others
People who smile more often have a more positive effect on their environment, and are better received by others ( Abel, MH, Hester, R. (2002). The therapeutic effects of smiling). Feeling "in place" with your surroundings may be essential to physical and emotional well-being. The Canadian Statistics Office reports that "Individuals who felt very strongly connected [in their society] had nearly twice the odds of reporting excellent or very good health, compared with those who reported a weak sense of community belonging." A more pragmatic benefit is that restaraunt workers who serve customers with a smile are observed to receive larger tips (Tidd & Lockard, 1978) and repeat business (Tsai, 2001). Smiling can even affect the way one person is recieved by another over the phone. A study, conducted by Amy Drahota, examined how smiling affects how people speak and are heard. From her research, she ascertained that "When we listen to people speaking, we may be picking up on all sorts of cues, even unconsciously, which help us to interpret the speaker."

Stress Relief
Smiling may help to reduce symptoms associated with anxiety. Mark Stibich, PhD, consultant at Columbia University, believes that "If you can slow your breathing down and change your expression, you may be able to turn around the stress cascade." Chronic stress does significant damage to to the body and mind. Reducing stress may lower blood pressure, improve digestion, regulate blood sugar and curb neurotic reactions brought on by prolonged anxiety.

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December 20th, 2013

15 Fascinating Facts About Smiling



Everyone loves the quote “laughter is the best medicine,” and as a nurse, I have experienced the benefits of smiling and laughter with my patients. In fact, smiling can boost your mood and even your immune system. Keep reading for more fascinating facts about our smiles.

1. Forcing yourself to smile can boost your mood: Psychologists have found that even if you’re in bad mood, you can instantly lift your spirits by forcing yourself to smile.

2. It boosts your immune system: Smiling really can improve your physical health, too. Your body is more relaxed when you smile, which contributes to good health and a stronger immune system.

3. Smiles are contagious: It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles all on their own.

4. Smiles Relieve Stress: Your body immediately releases endorphins when you smile, even when you force it. This sudden change in mood will help you feel better and release stress.

5. It’s easier to smile than to frown: Scientists have discovered that your body has to work harder and use more muscles to frown than it does to smile.

6. It’s a universal sign of happiness: While hand shakes, hugs, and bows all have varying meanings across cultures, smiling is known around the world and in all cultures as a sign of happiness and acceptance.

7. We still smile at work: While we smile less at work than we do at home, 30% of subjects in a research study smiled five to 20 times a day, and 28% smiled over 20 times per day at the office.

8. Smiles use from 5 to 53 facial muscles: Just smiling can require your body to use up to 53 muscles, but some smiles only use 5 muscle movements.

9. Babies are born with the ability to smile: Babies learn a lot of behaviors and sounds from watching the people around them, but scientists believe that all babies are born with the ability, since even blind babies smile.

10. Smiling helps you get promoted: Smiles make a person seem more attractive, sociable and confident, and people who smile more are more likely to get a promotion.

11. Smiles are the most easily recognizable facial expression: People can recognize smiles from up to 300 feet away, making it the most easily recognizable facial expression.

12. Women smile more than men: Generally, women smile more than men, but when they participate in similar work or social roles, they smile the same amount. This finding leads scientists to believe that gender roles are quite flexible. Boy babies, though, do smile less than girl babies, who also make more eye contact.

13. Smiles are more attractive than makeup: A research study conducted by Orbit Complete discovered that 69% of people find women more attractive when they smile than when they are wearing makeup.

14. There are 19 different types of smiles: UC-San Francisco researcher identified 19 types of smiles and put them into two categories: polite “social” smiles which engage fewer muscles, and sincere “felt” smiles that use more muscles on both sides of the face.

15. Babies start smiling as newborns: Most doctors believe that real smiles occur when babies are awake at the age of four-to-six weeks, but babies start smiling in their sleep as soon as they’re born.

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December 18th, 2013

The Importance of a Nice Smile

More often than you can imagine, we are reading self-help, business, marketing or sales book and come across a quote from author about the importance of a nice smile. The smile is so important that it has been mentioned to be sure to smile and smile often in some of the most well regarded business books of our time, and before our time. This is because our people of our society judge us by our teeth and smiles. People who smile often appear healthier, happier, and more approachable and more trust worthy. If you are not confidant with your smile, then we can help. Here is an accumulation of quotations about the importance of the smile from some of the best and most well regarded business, marketing, sales and self-help authors.


Jeffrey Gitomer’s Little Red Book of Selling: Jeffrey Gitmoer, page 126
“Making people smile or laugh puts them at ease and creates an atmosphere more conductive for agreement.”

Jeffrey Gitomer’s Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude: Jeffrey Gitomer, page 134-135
“I believe that a smile is the attribute of a positive attitude, both for yourself and the perception of others.”

“Your smile is one of the greatest attributes and assets you can possess…”

How to Win Friends and Influence People: Dale Carnegie, pages 66-74
“People who smile tend to manage, teach, and sell more effectively, and to raise happier children.”

“An ancient Chinese proverb...’A man without a smiling face must not open shop.’”

BOOM! 7 Choices for Blowing the Doors Off Business-as-Usual: Kevin and Jackie Freiberg, page xxv
“I can’t wait to see how good a day I can have. You can’t help but come up with a smile. And if you see someone without a smile, give ‘em yours.”

Lead or Get Off the Pot: Pat Croce, page 34
“The hotel’s general manager instructed his department heads—who were to perform the interviews--to automatically eliminate anyone who didn’t smile within the first five seconds. No teeth showing, then get the hell out of here!”

I Feel Great and You Will Too!: Pat Croce, page 144
“When interviewing prospective employees, Fast Eddie and I looked for positive-thinking people who smiles easily and often.”

How Full is Your Bucket?: Tom Rath and Donald Clifton, page 94
“15-question Positive Impact Test…14. I always smile at people I meet.”

The Fred Factor: Mark Sanborn, page 104
“’It doesn’t take much time to make someone smile. And if I can make someone on my route smile, that’s my reward,’ says Fred.”

The Art of Talking to Anyone: Rosalie Maggio, page 9
“But the smile—oh, the smile will work miracles. It is the most importance body language of all…”

The Power of Nice: How to Conquer the Business World with Kindness: Linda Thaler and Robin Koval, pages 34 and 36
“The best way to spread these good feelings? With a big toothy smile, the most contagious gesture of all…when you smile at others, you literally “infect” them with happiness.”

“It’s a lot easier to make your client, you boss, or your husband more receptive to you ideas if you say it with a smile.”

Tiger Traits: 9 Success Secrets you can discover from Tiger Woods to be a business Champion: Nate Booth, page 116
“Tiger Woods has a terrific smile that he flashes often. So should you. At it’s most basic level, a smile signals to others that you’re a friend, not a foe.”

The Energy Bus: Jon Gordon, pages 29 and 143
“See, George, you chose to smile and just by doing that one thing, you changed your energy. A smile changes the way you feel, the way you think, and how you interact with others.”

“The goal in life is to live young, have fun, and arrive at your final destination as late as possible, with a smile on your face.”

You, Inc: The Art of Selling Yourself: Harry Beckwith, page 38
“Time and again in sales and marketing, we realize a powerful influence: The visual overwhelms the verbal.

The Nordstrom Way to Customer Service Excellence: Robert Spector and Patrick McCarthy, pages 89 and 91
“Nordstrom’s #1 Customer Service Strategy, Hire the Smile”

“We can hire nice people and teach them to sell, but we can’t hire salespeople and teach them to be nice…hire the smile, train the skill.”

The Power of Charm: Brian Tracy and Ron Arden, pages 12 and 72
“And how do you express complete acceptance? It is simple. You smile! When you smile with happiness at seeing people, their self-esteem jumps automatically. They feel happy about themselves. They feel important and valuable. And they like the person who is making them feel this way.”

“There’s no question that smiling and laughing are clear indictors of how much you are enjoying being someone. A genuine smile involves muscles that surround your mouth and your eyes. When you smile, make sure you get all of your face to smile. Let it go right up to your eyes.”



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